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Posts Tagged: Beyond Indigo Pets Marketing

Introduction to YouTube for Small Business

YouTube

YouTube: Yes, YouTube is a social media destination. It also is the second-largest search engine on the Internet after Google. Plus Google owns YouTube. YouTube needs to be integrated into a website’s content as well as developing a YouTube channel for the business. For example please visit http://www.youtube.com/AnimalMedicalHosp to see a hospital’s YouTube page in action.  Or click go here http://www.animalmedical.net/veterinary-services/acupuncture.html to view how a YouTube channel is embedded into a website. Some key facts about YouTube to know are:

Founded: February 2005

Numbers:

  • 3rd Most Viewed Website
  • Every day 4 billion videos are viewed
  • 800 million active users a month
  • 700 YouTube videos shared on Twitter per minute

Business Only Platform: Yes, there are branded YouTube Channels for business Continue reading

Introduction to Facebook for Small Business

 

Facebook – When people think social media the first thing that tends to pop to mind is Facebook. It is the most climbed “social media mountain” for marketing journeys. The highlights of Facebook to know are as followed:          

Founded: In 2004

Numbers: As of October 4, 2012 there are over 1 billion active users. In the USA 137.6 million users.

Business Only Platforms: Yes, there is a separate business only pages vs. Personal.

Time Per User/Per Month: 7:45 hours a month in the US

Business Needs to Devote: Minimum of 5 hours a week on their Facebook Page.

Mobile: 54% of month users access Facebook through a mobile device.

When starting your marketing efforts in social media Facebook is one of the first ones to approach. Why? Because the sheer number of people using it and the amount of time they spend on Facebook. In eight years Facebook has become integrated into people’s lives. It is where they are building and maintaining relationships. Continue reading

Your Marketing Journey – Part 1: What to Pack

When a person goes on a Journey we think of a trip that has multiple stops and extends over a period of time. Other times we use the word “Journey” to mean a process that is an every changing that allows us to grow and develop. It is time to think of your marketing program as a “Journey”. A process that involves more than one “stop” and is every changing and every growing. Why? Because frame of mind is everything to embracing a process. If you are still in the mentality that you check the box once a year on your marketing and then go back to medicine, then your business has a higher chance of not maintaining and gaining new relationships. Lack of maintaining relationships could mean less customers and that would be suboptimal.

For your marketing Journey there are a few essentials to sneak into your travel back pack that will be your roadmap and guide along the way. Every aspect of your marketing should fall into these guidelines.

Continue reading

Just Because You Say It – Do People Hear It?

Communicating tends to be one of the hardest aspects of all relationships.  For the doctor/patient relationship, it’s easy to assume that because the doctor provides health information the pet owner hears it. But do they? Not really.  Why? Pet owners today tend to:

  • Have their face in their phone.
  • Are overwhelmed with the medical information the doctor is presenting.
  • Focus on other anxieties in their life and aren’t focusing on the present.
  • Are emotionally processing the first piece of information presented and miss the rest of the medical update.
  • Forget or modify the content of the information presented over time.  (Think of the game telephone). Continue reading

QUICK! DON"T MISS IT! – People are talking about "it".

Have you heard people talking about “it”? Murmurings are happening in convention halls, small group presentations, and in one-on-one conversations. The buzz is growing louder, and people are getting excited. Energy is building, and people are ready to start implementing “it.” Maybe you have already started “IT”:

  • Do negative clients exhaust you?
  • Have you given up watching the news because it just bums you out?
  • Are you looking for a solution that focuses on the positive vs. the negative?
  • Have you started to notice big box stores nibbling away at your customer relationships?
  • Are you realizing you are tired of being a victim to fear?
  • Do you feel happier when you are helping others than thinking of yourself?

Then you have already started “IT.” The Positive-Based Marketing Revolution vs. the old Fear-Based Model. It is liberating, and it is working. Hospitals that are focusing on the positive are thriving. What is Positive-Based Marketing vs. Fear-Based Thinking? It is a new way to view life, and it is a paradigm shift. Here are some concepts to get you started.

Focus on what you can control in your life versus what is out of your control.

We have been trained extensively through the main media channels to get riled up by events that are out of our control. Think of the daily news channels. Their primary focus is fear. However, most of the items being shown on the news are completely out of your control. The most you can do to help the people in an accident, or the people suffering drought, or the swings on Wall Street is to send positive thoughts or prayers. Instead of pouring emotional energy into something that you have zippo control over, take that wonderful energy and create and change what you can influence.

For example, look at product placement sales. As Fritz Wood, CPA, CFP, states in his recent lecture:

“God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference. At the Central Veterinary Conference, one of my presentations focused on the Serenity Prayer and, specifically, its application to product sales in veterinary practices.

The quality of your life may improve dramatically if you let go of those things over which you have no control. Examples of things you cannot change include:

The fact that popular parasite control products are sold online
The fact that popular parasite control products are sold by big box stores

Yeah, yeah . . . life’s not always fair. Now stop complaining and compete! Have the courage to change the things you can. Now focus on the things you can control, such as:

Price (price matching? price competitively? display price per month or dose? etc.)
Promotion/signage/merchandising
Reminding clients to refill (phone, text, email, postcard, etc.)”

Read the rest of Fritz Wood’ suggestions next week on this blog.

Empower the relationships in your life and work together.

Focus on creating relationships that are empowering and in your circle of influence. These would be your current clients, future clients, staff, and other veterinary professionals in town. How can you make their lives better?

Client Relationships: For your current and future clients, how can you influence your pet owners to leave in a happier, more positive place? Hospitals that make their clients feel better have strong relationships with those clients. The stronger the relationship, the more likely pet owners will keep using you rather than another source for veterinary care. Seriously, don’t we all like to do business with companies that make us feel better? We dread dealing with “Debbie Downer” people because it drags us down. In fact, people are now comparing service against their “gold standard.”

As Dr. Robert Cartin from Mission Animal Hospital states:

“Businesses, including veterinary practices, no longer operate and compete solely in their sector. Clients evaluate our service and image not only against other veterinary hospitals, but also against the best service and image they experience anywhere. Pet owners do not say, ‘This practice’s service is good by veterinary standards.’ They compare us with the service they receive at Nordstrom’s, Disneyland, or the best hotel they have stayed at. The client does not think, ‘This is a good veterinary website.’ The client simply thinks, ‘This is a good, user-friendly website’ or ‘This is an amateurish, cluttered, and difficult to navigate website.’ And what message about how you practice does that send to the subconscious mind?”

How your hospital relates to other businesses is becoming the new focus, not how your business compares to the guy down the street. Time to shift your thinking to this new paradigm.

Staff Relationships: Staff relationships and interactions in the hospital, both positive and negative, are noticed by clients. Dr. Don Morshead from Pet Medical Center-Chatoak says, “We recognize that staff relationships at all levels (doctors, techs, and front office staff) can highly influence client satisfaction and decision making. This is a frequent topic of discussion at our staff meetings. We emphasize and practice edifying each other, which means building up or saying something positive about each other when communicating with clients. For example: Dr. Jackson will be caring for Fluffy tomorrow; you will be in very competent hands… she’s the best or Isn’t Dr. Jones great? His clients really like him (especially important when seeing another doctor’s patient or a referral). This type of communication starts the relationship out on a very positive note.” If the opposite is done (making yourself look good at the expense of another staff member), Dr. Morshead said, clients will feel uncomfortable and lose confidence.

Professional Relationships: Finally, working together with the other veterinary professionals in town is important. The big box stores are starting to form relationships with clients over pet care. Instead of worrying about the hospital down the street, focus instead on keeping your clients visiting a veterinarian for medical information instead of Target, Costco, Wal-Mart, or Kroger’s grocery stores. Banding together and helping each other to educate pet owners about the quality of care provided by veterinarians will help everyone.

As Dr. Robert Carton from Mission Animal Hospital states:

“One of my colleagues asked why I want to share ideas that have made us successful. I believe that the more practices that understand these things, the higher the bar is raised for all of veterinary medicine, which is a good thing for all of our stakeholders—pets, pet owners, the veterinary team, and practice owner.”

Give up the fear addiction
Most of us are addicted to fear and drama, which then sucks up our energy that we could be using to empower and create positive relationships and, therefore, better business. Fear and drama, for some people, create a sense of self-importance because they are in the center of the “excitement” and are the center of attention. Drama cannot be sustained and will peter out. At that point, people get depressed, which sucks in others around them asking what is wrong. This again diverts energy away from creation and building a better stronger business.

Give Up FEAR.

You will then have more energy to create and empower yourself, your business, and other relationships.

Focus on abundance versus lack

Another aspect of our fear-based conditioning is we focus on what we don’t have versus what we do have. By focusing on this negative conditioning, we are funneling our limited energy and time, which curtails our ability to create and empower ourselves to find new solutions. By giving up our focus on “lack” and turning our attention to “create/empower,” we have the opportunity to grow and enrich our businesses.

New Way of Thinking, But Isn’t It a Relief?

We get it. We know this is a new way of thinking that, for some, will make you feel vulnerable. For others, it will be a relief with the comment “it is about dang time.” Welcome the change and focus your marketing on these principles versus ones based in fear. To help you along this new path, we have created a new blog at www.positivebasedmarketing.com that is linked to a Facebook page at www.facebook.com/positivebasedmarketing/ and a Twitter feed at @GetPositiveNow.

Positive Based Marketing – It's Here!

Positive Based Marketing Logo

Positive Based Marketing

Hello! This is Kelly, the CEO of Beyond Indigo. We have taken our focus on Positive Based Marketing a step further and putting our research and knowledge into a blog as well as a Facebook page. This week we are focusing a post from this new blog. We look forward to your liking our Facebook Page as well as following our new blog on Positive Based Marketing vs. Fear Based Marketing. 

The idea seems “cool” to be positive, but really what is Positive-Based Marketing vs. Fear-Based Marketing? When a business uses Positive Marketing, what they are doing is creating and empowering relationships between themselves and their current/future clients. This creates a whole and a oneness with all parties that are involved. Ideally, the business creating the marketing is trying to improve the value and quality of the life of the person using that business’ services. In return, the person using the services is enabling that company to stay in business through his or her engagement and interaction with the business. It is a win–win and creates a positive atmosphere. Plus, people are encouraged to think whether this particular product or service is a good fit for them. People tend to be happier and more fulfilled with Positive-Based Marketing.

Now, think of the negative marketing campaigns that you have seen. Fear is used in Fear-Based Marketing to sever relationships or isolate people from their relationships. It backs people into a corner and makes them panic thinking they will no longer be accepted by the group/society if they don’t use the product or service being marketed. Fear-Based Marketing also encourages people to react — and not to think. For example, if a female watches a cosmetic commercial, she is usually told that she will not be beautiful or accepted by society unless she wears that exact shade of red. She will be “kicked” out of the group, so to speak. To be included in the whole, she needs to wear that shade of red and, therefore, she must immediately go buy that shade of red. She is not empowered to think: This shade is great for me; therefore, I will purchase it. People tend to be more fearful and anxious with this type of marketing.

To read other posts on this blog please click here.

Fasten Your Seat Belts Because Google Changed Again

Google Plus Logo

Google Plus

Just as we were enjoying our Memorial Day weekend, Google went quietly about making some significant changes to its algorithm that heavily impacts local businesses. If you want to understand how to keep being “seen” in Google, these new changes must be adapted in your practice’s online marketing program.

First Change: Google Search Results Went Hybrid

This past year, when we used Google for an online search, the results would show paid advertising at the top or far right (which only 25% of people click on), with local search results shown next — listed in packs of 7 or 10 and accompanied by corresponding map markers starting with the letter “A,”, followed by organic (non-local) results. Google has now integrated organic and local search results together, which currently display on the search results page in varying ways — in packs of 3, 5 or 7 for example, depending on the search query. Search results are still formatted with paid advertising at the top or right under the map on the results page, but you’ll now see organic results listed BEFORE, and blended with, local search results. How does a business become listed in this new hybrid format and at the top of local search results? What we have learned is to focus on the following:

  1. It is crucial to have a custom-designed website that can be optimized (coded) down to the page with local search terms, specific relevant industry keywords (veterinarian, pet cancer, etc.), and appropriate geographic regional terms.
  2. When choosing location keywords, check how close your business is to the center of the city. To do this, go to Google Maps (maps.google.com) and type in your city and state; e.g., Minneapolis MN. Google will then display a marker on the map with the letter “A” — where it considers the center of the city to be located. This letter “A” is what Google calls the “centroid.” The closer your business is to the this centroid, the more “votes” your local business listing receives toward being near the top of local search results for that city. With this approach, Google is attempting to make the search experience most relevant to the searcher’s query.
  3. Plentiful (five or more) positive online reviews help maintain good positioning in Google Local Search. Google purchased the Zagat review site and is now incorporating these reviews into Google local listings. Reviews are becoming increasingly important. Having reviews associated with your business listing is yet another key ranking factor and one of the many signals Google looks for.

To read the rest of this article in a PDF format please click here: Fasten Your Seat Belt – Google Made Changes Again

Your Brand, Your Reputation (repost)

Local Search & Online Reviews

Online Reviews on Google

More so than ever a business has to watch its brand on the Internet. People can interact and define your brand without your input. As I have stated in many speaking venues even though most veterinarians are face to face and on the phone type of people doesn’t mean your pet owners are! Here are some tips to get you started with your brand management.

Where People Can Interact With Your Brand

People perceived your brand and your business differently 10 years ago than they do today. Now, people have choices and the ability to research information themselves before making a purchasing decision. In the past, we used to have to rely on the vendors to give us information about their businesses. Now, with a few quick taps of our fingers, a wealth of knowledge is available for us to consume. What people find about your business and where they find it determines how they see your brand. Does your business seem trendy? Up to date? Resourceful and helpful? Can a viewer find the information he or she needs quickly on any device, 24/7? These are questions to ask when reviewing how your business is perceived online. Where are people making these decisions?

Today, people are using multiple touchpoints when making a purchasing decision. A touchpoint is a place people start at or go to when researching. A pet owner could start at Google, read reviews, leap over to a business website, click through to Facebook, follow on Twitter, read a blog piece, and so forth. These touchpoints, when joined together, turn into a marketing circle. The goal is to keep an interested pet owner in your marketing circle. If there is a disconnect, a person might leap to another business’s marketing circle and you have potentially lost that sale. Each of these touchpoints (or platforms) defines your brand in the eye of the viewer. Here are some key points to keep in mind.

  1. Google now focuses on local search for a business. This local search feature focuses on online reviews, Google+, Twitter “tweets,” and blog comments. Google’s goal appears to be to give us as much information about a business in one “snapshot.” For example,  take a look at Animal Medical Hospital in Charlotte, NC. You will see my picture listed under the search result because I +1 this brand or “liked” it, in other words. Google is providing social media information now mixed in with search engine optimization results. Why? To keep a person using Google and not Facebook.

To read the rest of this article please download this PDF. YourBrandYourReputation